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Recyclebank’s Green Schools Program is BACK!
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Recyclebank’s Green Schools Program is BACK!

Virginia (sometimes Beth) Cain is a Community Outreach Coordinator at Recyclebank.  In her spare time, she brunches locally, relentlessly roots for Ohio sports, laughs at her own jokes and picks up litter with her bare hands. 

It’s time again for the Recyclebank Green Schools Program!

With 38 schools being accepted across the country, and 15 coming right here from Philly, we have a lot to celebrate…and DO!

Together, these schools are working towards a total of $32,563 in grant money for a variety of environmental projects and there’s only one way to get them to that goal: Donate. Your. Recyclebank. Points.

C.W. Henry school - Recyclebank programs
C.W. Henry School – Spring 2014 Garden Sessions with Farm Educator David Siller: Lettuce and kale harvest and cleaning

C’mon, would you rather get a discount at Macy’s or help students help their school? This SHOULD be a no brainer.  Donate your points by visiting Recyclebank.com/greenschools.

Here are the schools you can help – and what amazing projects they have in store:

  • Belmont Charter ($2495) seeks to build learning gardens to teach students about the nutritional and environmental benefits of eating local, fresh and smart. Part of their budget also covers the cost of a rotating composter, as well as plans for an outdoor classroom.
  • Central High School ($2500) is looking for begin a multi-year project, beginning with hiring a composting service to get them started. The Student Environmental Action Society will be responsible for initiating and managing the food waste collection process, and working with the hired service. In later phases of the project, CHS hopes to create their own compost on schools grounds. The product, whether from the school or service, will be used to repair and maintain school grounds and planter boxes.
  • George McCall Elementary ($2000) wants you to “Get Out and Garden” with their new community campaign. Last year, McCall received Recyclebank money to build planter boxes; this year they are looking to expand on that success, encourage more students to participate and truly develop outdoor learning spaces where they can manage, maintain, grow and steward.
  • George W. Childs Elementary ($2500) will be preserving an existing upcycled artwork garden, created by a former art teacher. Grant monies will be used in the restoration process, as well as expansion of the area. They would like to create a vegetable garden and orchard, as well as start a Garden Club. This would serve as place for students and community members to meet on formal and informal occasions.
  • George W. Nebinger Elementary ($960) are planning to save water, build gardens, and teach students, families and community members alike the important of an urban food system. They are even looking into solar sensors for their irrigation system!
  • George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science ($2500) are ditching excess bottles and installing a bottle filling station. The Carver HSES Green Team will also be using grant dollars to create quality educational materials to encourage students to use the stations, be better environmental stewards and of course….to recycle.
  • Henry C. Lea Elementary ($2500) is turning their urban heat island playground into a green urban oasis. Complete with rain gardens, an increased tree canopy and more green plants than ever before, Lea Elementary is the place to be this summer.
  • John B. Kelly Elementary ($2412) is all about organic gardening this year. Using Recyclebank grant money, they want to engage students from seed to harvest, and everything in between. Placing an emphasis back on the soil, they refuse to let commonplace litter and apathy stop them. Working with the Philadelphia School District, they will incorporate fresh vegetables and herbs into their school lunch time.
  • John Story Jenks Academy for the Arts and Sciences ($2473) A repeat Recyclebank Green School, JS Jenks wants to expand the eco-curriculum from greenhouse to aquaponics, vermicultures, and more. Regardless the season, these students want fresh crops, and they want them now!
  • Joseph Greenberg Elementary ($2500) Recyclebank new comer, Greenberg Elementary aims to turn an unsightly area of their school grounds into a beautiful and educational butterfly garden, complete with community involvement and engagement opportunities.
  • Richard Allen Prep Charter ($1523) is going “Whittle their Waste” by expanding their school’s recycling program. Through creative and engaging tactics, the RAPCS Green Team will work to encourage fellow students to generate less, recycle more and have fun doing it.
  • Southwest Leadership Academy ($1320) is getting on the recycling train. They will use their funding to purchase containers for the development and implementation of a school wide program.
  • Springside Chestnut Hill Academy ($2380) has big plans for a zero waste cafeteria. Already on board with recycling and composting, SCHA now wants to install a refillable water station to cut plastics from lunch time.
  • The Waldorf School of Philadelphia ($2000) are planning to use their Recyclebank funds to build or obtain recycling and composting containers, as well as build a corral for outdoor storage. In order to maintain their new school location to the best of their ability they understand the importance of whole process, not just separating the materials in the classroom.
  • Penn Charter ($2500) is trying to ‘ban the bottle’. Using grant money, a reusable bottle will be purchased for every student and community member, in hopes to change the behaviors and attitudes surrounding single use plastics, petroleum based products and the Philadelphia municipal water service.
Past Recyclebank Project: Digging a hole for the permanent trellis for the blackberries
Past Recyclebank Project: Digging a hole for the permanent trellis for the blackberries

Need a last minute refresher course? Earn points with your weekly recycling collection, take green quizzes or read about sustainable topics on the site, then donate!

garden-recyclebank-project

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Virginia (sometimes Beth) Cain is a Community Outreach Coordinator at Recyclebank. In her spare time, she brunches locally, relentlessly roots for Ohio sports, laughs at her own jokes and picks up litter with her bare hands. View all posts by Virginia Cain

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