Close Subscribe

Get the Weekly Recap!!

Get recaps, exclusive offers, stories and discounts. We’ll never share your email address and you can opt out at any time, we promise.
News

Audubon's TogetherGreen Fellowship Philly Recipient!

The National Audubon Society (with support from Toyota) recently awarded TogetherGreen Fellowships to 40 of the nation’s most promising conservationists – one of whom is representing Philadelphia!  Keith Russell has been protecting birds and wildlife for over two decades with fellow Philadelphians. 

Keith started the Philadelphia Mid-Winter Bird Census which includes a reservoir in Fairmount Park – and will soon be the site of a new Audubon Center where locals can learn, enjoy and work our city’s nature. 

The TogetherGreen Fellowship (part of the TogetherGreen Conservation Leadership Program) is designed to assist individuals with great potential to help shape a brighter environmental future.  Fellows receive specialized training in conservation planning and execution, the chance to work and share best practices with gifted conservation professionals, and assistance with project outreach and evaluation.  Additionally, each Fellow will receive $10,000 towards a community-focused project to engage local residents in conserving land, water and energy, and contributing to greater environmental health.

During Keith’s fellowship he’ll be organizing a study on bird migrations and urban effects.  Specifically, volunteers with be collecting data on bird collisions with building windows, combining citizen science and wildlife conservation efforts through the current migration seasons.  This study will help reveal how building lights and glass in downtown Philadelphia affect many of the migratory birds that pass through our city each spring and fall, allowing Russell (and others) to work towards a safer place for these winged travelers.

Turning off lights and reducing the transparency and reflection caused by building glass will help protect these birds from deadly collisions, educate community members and business owners about the perils migratory birds face in cities, and ultimately help slow the rate at which many of these species are now declining.  A great side-effect will hopefully initiate further environmental awareness across the city so residents can reduce their electricity use.

Check the full list of Fellows efforts – They’ll help people and wildlife around 39 cities in 24 different states.

 For more info, visit TogetherGreen or check them out on Facebook.

Posted by Julie

Become a Supporter!

If you love what we do you can support our mission with a one-time or monthly contribution.
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  object(WP_Term)#5409 (10) {
    ["term_id"]=>
    int(153)
    ["name"]=>
    string(12) "conservation"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(12) "conservation"
    ["term_group"]=>
    int(0)
    ["term_taxonomy_id"]=>
    int(153)
    ["taxonomy"]=>
    string(8) "post_tag"
    ["description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["count"]=>
    int(9)
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
  }
  [1]=>
  object(WP_Term)#5599 (10) {
    ["term_id"]=>
    int(584)
    ["name"]=>
    string(12) "Philadelphia"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(12) "philadelphia"
    ["term_group"]=>
    int(0)
    ["term_taxonomy_id"]=>
    int(587)
    ["taxonomy"]=>
    string(8) "post_tag"
    ["description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["count"]=>
    int(161)
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
  }
}
Julie Hancher
Julie Hancher is Editor-in-Chief of Green Philly, sharing her expertise of all things sustainable in the city of brotherly love. She enjoys long walks in the park with local beer and greening her travels, cooking & cat, Sir Floofus Drake. View all posts by Julie Hancher

1 thought on “Audubon's TogetherGreen Fellowship Philly Recipient!

  1. Bird window fatalities have been garnering increased attention in recent years but are still largely ignored publicly. According to research, window kills account for the deaths of one billion birds a year in the United States alone. This number is enough birds to wrap around the equator four times. Environmentally speaking, even if only one million birds were killed each year, it would require approximately 333 Exxon Valdez oil spills to capture the same number of victims. Research indicates that glass collisions can be prevented if a bird is confronted by “visual noise” on the window’s exterior. These patterns can be dots, stars, shapes of other birds – regardless of the form it takes, it’s the spacing the matters. Patterns should be no more than 2 inches horizontally and 4 inches vertically.
    Sheet glass is the “most underappreciated lethal threat to birds” – it is indiscriminate in what size or species it takes as its victim.
    Although the high-rise buildings we see in the city are very beautiful aesthetically speaking, they pose a lethal threat for birds in flight. Swarthmore College has been a pioneer in this effort to eliminate the threat of reflective glass, by installing special glass, manufactured in a way that prevents such collisions from occurring. Seen in a larger context, endangered and vulnerable species of birds that are already fighting to survive could be easily forced into extinction by a universally present threat such as glass.
    I believe that being green is synonymous with being environmentally responsible and protecting all of the earth’s inhabitants.
    I would urge anyone interested in this issue to educate themselves on the ways in which they can prevent window killings from occurring.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Green Philly

Featured
In These
Great Spots: